M M M using kitkatknit logic

More modern math. Please check my work. (or maybe not) Unless of course you are Mr. Morrison, my algebra teacher from 9th grade and then I say &%#@ *!^.

(Damn it I am still not going to do toe up socks. I’m going to fight it to the end. Just because.) 5:33 am as I was grabbing some socks out of my sock drawer I noticed that my handknit socks when folded over are just about split so 50% is above and 50% the heel turn. Duh.

So I was a-thinkin’ (dangerous I know without a safety net, lifeboat or coffee) that I should be able to figure out proportion/percentage wise how much yarn is needed for a cuff, heel flap/gussett, foot and toe. In grams. For handspun. I drew up this crude diagram with the measurements. I always use the same number of stitches around on the cuff as I do the foot. I can add say 10% to the total for fudge factor/life boat. Or not.
sock-figures.jpg
8.5 inches from top of cuff to heel turn, 9.5″ from heel turn to kitchner graft. I’d say 45% (top) and 55% (bottom) since the toe has decreases. So (using kitkatknit logic) if I use about 1/3 of my yarn alloted for one sock and then start on my heel flap, I should be OK. Everybody with me here? My latest handspun is 110 grams, 55 grams alloted per sock. So tomorrow I am going to use 18 grams for the cuff. That should leave 9 grams for heel flap/gussett, 18 grams for foot and 9 for toe. Roughly. Your mileage may vary.

You can stop laughing now Jessica. Just wait till I win the Nobel Prize in Knitting Math for this one.

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3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Jessica
    May 03, 2007 @ 19:44:31

    Have you ever tried weighing a sock in progress as you were making it? That could be the magic ticket.

    Reply

  2. jessie
    May 04, 2007 @ 09:42:52

    I would love to know if this works out for you, as I’m working on a handspun sock right now wondering if the toe of the second one is going to be a different yarn altogether. I’m forever making my cuffs too short, just in case, you know?

    I was thinking of measuring the yarn and the needles before, and then measuring the in-progress sock at various stages and making notes so I can know for the future what percentage of yarn I can use for longer cuffs.

    Then I just decided not to think about it.

    Reply

  3. Chris
    May 05, 2007 @ 03:33:15

    Um, wow, that’s complicated. Now, how are your calculations going to be affected by coffee consumption (knit tighter) or alcohol consumption (knit looser)?

    Reply

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